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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3W35V

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External sensors for the feedback control of functional electrical stimulation assisted walking Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
stroke
feedback
walking
functional electrical stimulation
segment angle
angular velocity
accelerometer
spinal cord injury
sensors
FSR
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lovse, Lisa
Supervisor and department
Prochazka, Arthur (Biomedical Engineering)
Stein, Richard (Biomedical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Fyfe, Ken (Mechanical Engineering)
Mushahwar, Vivian (Cell Biology)
Department
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-27T21:04:22Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a rehabilitative technology that can be used to improve walking in individuals with mobility impairments due to neurologic injury or disease. Feedback is essential for efficient FES-assisted walking. The overall goal of my project was to investigate external sensors to provide feedback for FES-assisted walking. The current study evaluated accelerometers, force sensitive resistors, segment orientation angles, and segment angular velocities to determine which were appropriate for determining the activation and deactivation of six major muscles used for walking. The results demonstrated that the segment orientation angles were the most appropriate sensors. Using the segment angle of the thigh, shank, and foot, the activation and deactivation times of the six muscles investigated could be determined within 6% of the step cycle. The shank segment angle performed the best for determining the activation and deactivation times when only one sensor was desired.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3W35V
Rights
License granted by Lisa Lovse (lovse@ualberta.ca) on 2010-09-24T22:12:49Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Microsoft Word - Thesis final.docx
File author: Lisa Lovse
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