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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34S4J

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"Identity" Constructions in Online Learning Events: Gender, Subjectivities, and the Productive Effects of Power Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Power
Identity
Gender
Online Learning
Subjectivitiy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lawlor, Carmen G
Supervisor and department
Wallace, Janice (Educational Policy Studies)
Haughey, Margaret (Vice President Academic, Athabasca University)
Examining committee member and department
Sammel, Ali (School of Education and Professional Studies, Griffith University)
Adams, Catherine (Secondary Education)
Grace, Andre (Educational Policy Studies)
Spencer, Brenda (Educational Policy Studies)
Department
Department of Educational Policy Studies
Specialization
Adult Education
Date accepted
2012-12-11T11:38:30Z
Graduation date
2013-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
ABSTRACT Advances in computer technology have created powerful opportunities for learners to engage with others, producing very different contexts for learning, and for negotiating our very way of being. Yet, engagement in these virtual learning environments also raises many questions around how our (re)positioning within the discourses available to us, structures our understanding of self, our social reality, and our subjectivities. In this study I embarked upon a poststructural critique of the experiences of six women enrolled in a graduate online learning program to explore how subject positions and subjectivities are produced, the possible enactments of self within this context, and the ways in which these women resisted or adhered to the dominant discourses in their individual identifications. My investigation identified four discourses that influenced the ways in which their subjectivities were shaped, including discourses of difference; competence; gender; and connection, conflict, and control.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34S4J
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: dissertation proposal
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Page count: 226
File language: en-CA
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