ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Characterization of homologs of peroxisome assembly genes in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogasterDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R33Q5X

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Characterization of homologs of peroxisome assembly genes in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
DmelPex
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Virk, Maninder
Supervisor and department
Rachubinski, Richard (Cell Biology)
Examining committee member and department
Rachubinski, Richard (Cell Biology)
Simmonds, Andrew (Cell Biology)
Locke, John (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Cell Biology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-01-31T16:22:48Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Peroxisomes are single-membrane-bound ubiquitous organelles required for several important metabolic pathways like lipid metabolism and peroxide detoxification. They are indispensable for normal human development, because lack of metabolically functional peroxisomes causes fatal peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBDs). In this study, 14 putative Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster) homologs of known PEX genes were identified using a dsRNA interference screen in cultured D. melanogaster S2 cells. In humans, mutations of the PEX1 gene are the most common cause of the PBD, Zellweger syndrome. Further, detailed phenotypic characterization of the D. melanogaster PEX1 homolog (DmelPex1) showed that it is required for complete larval development. DmelPex1 mutant larvae exhibit abnormalities similar to those observed in Zellweger syndrome patients, including developmental delay, poor feeding, structural abnormalities in the peripheral and central nervous systems, and premature death. Overall, this study supports the use of D. melanogaster as an invaluable model for the PBDs.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R33Q5X
Rights
License granted by Maninder Virk (mvirk@ualberta.ca) on 2011-01-31T03:06:20Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-30T21:57:44.482+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1357831
Last modified: 2015:10:12 16:24:53-06:00
Filename: Virk_Maninder_Spring 2011.pdf
Original checksum: 0e55382fe3544fa02c5021aadd086544
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Invalid object number or object stream offset=1313218
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date