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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3XW4846Q

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Axon excitability testing shows increased IH activity in populations of slow versus fast motor axons of the rat Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Axon
motor control
IH
axon plasticity
axon ion channels
ionic conductances
ALS
hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying cation conductance
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Axon physiology
axon excitability testing
motor axons
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lorenz, Chad D
Supervisor and department
Jones, Kelvin (Physical Education and Recreation)
Collins, David (Physical Education and Recreation)
Examining committee member and department
Ming, Chan (Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation)
Misiaszek, John (Occupational Therapy)
Department
Physical Education and Recreation
Centre for Neuroscience
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-06-14T13:59:39Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Despite extensive knowledge of variations in motoneuron (MN) soma and muscle properties across different healthy muscles or motor units, there is comparatively little knowledge about variations in motor axon electrophysiology across different axon groups. Axon excitability testing (AET) is an in vivo method which indirectly examines motor axon electrophysiology. We used AET in Sprague-Dawley rats to compare axons innervating tibialis anterior (“fast” motor axons) to axons innervating soleus (“slow” motor axons). We found that fast and slow motor axons differ significantly in their accommodation to hyperpolarizing currents, and in their post-spike excitability oscillation. Specifically, we found compelling evidence that slow motor axons have greater activity of the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying cation conductance (IH) than fast motor axons. Since fast and slow motor axons have different daily activity patterns, this foreshadows the possibility of activity-dependent plasticity in at least one ionic conductance of the motor axon.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3XW4846Q
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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