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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3MK6K

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A comparison of two computer-based programs designed to improve facial expression understanding in children with autism Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
computer-based intervention
autism
facial expression understanding
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Sung, Andrew Nock-Kwan
Supervisor and department
Smith, Veronica (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Magill-Evans, Joyce (Occupational Therapy)
Buck, George (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-08-29T17:29:19Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This randomized clinical trial compared models used to explain facial expression understanding difficulties experienced by individuals with autism. The intervention effects of two computer-based training programs, The Transporters and Let’s Face It! were investigated in young children with autism (N = 21), aged 4-8 years old. The Transporters is an animated series designed to enhance emotion comprehension informed by Theory of Mind and Extreme Male Brain theories. Let’s Face It! has seven interactive games designed to improve children’s visual face perception strategies and is informed by Weak Central Coherence theory. Children were assessed on measures before and after 20 hours of intervention. Compared to children randomized to a no treatment control group (n = 7), children receiving The Transporters training (n = 8) or Let’s Face It! program (n = 6) experienced no significant improvement. Verbal ability and age of participants was linked to performance on the facial understanding measures.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3MK6K
Rights
License granted by Andrew Sung (ansung@ualberta.ca) on 2011-08-27T14:09:26Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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