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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3SH7T

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The Effect of Soft Tissue on the Propagation of Ultrasonic Guided Waves Through Long Bones Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
ultrasound
guided wave
soft tissue
cortical bone
Lamb wave
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Stieglitz, Lauren
Supervisor and department
Le, Lawrence (Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging)
Gu, Jeff (Physics)
Examining committee member and department
Fenrich, Frances (Physics)
Kawchuk, Greg (Physical Therapy)
Thompson, Richard (Biomedical Engineering)
Department
Department of Physics and Department of Biomedical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-29T05:14:29Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Guided waves have been successfully used to characterize long bone properties, however the layer of soft tissue covering bone must be considered for guided wave technology to be clinically viable. We analyzed the impact of soft tissue through in vitro experiments on a cortical bone plate with and without a soft tissue mimic, and in vivo experiments on human tibiae. Data was examined using time-frequency analysis and frequency-phase velocity spectra. The data consistently exhibits two distinctive wave packets of different velocities. Guided wave modes A1 and S1 are generated in the soft tissue-bone plate model in addition to A0 and S0 generated in the bone. The presence of soft tissue alters the guide wave energy distribution. Most of the guided wave energy is concentrate around 0.1 – 0.2 MHz. The same phenomena are observed in the in vivo data. The in vitro experiments were in agreement with theoretical predictions.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3SH7T
Rights
License granted by Lauren Stieglitz (las11@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-28T17:15:20Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 46507454
Last modified: 2015:10:12 16:10:05-06:00
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Status message: File header gives version as 1.4, but catalog dictionary gives version as 1.3
File title: Microsoft Word - Thesis_FINALVERSION.doc
File author: Lauren Stieglitz
Page count: 114
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