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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3MS3K89G

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Ankylosaur (Dinosauria, Ankylosauria) foot morphology and an assessment of the function of the limbs and feet Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Manus
Limb
Pes
Morphology
FEA
Ankylosaur
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Sissons, Robin L.
Supervisor and department
Currie, Philip (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Holmes, Robert (Biological Sciences)
Caldwell, Michael (Biological Sciences)
Wolfe, Alexander (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-05-02T21:09:31Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Morphology and function of ankylosaur dinosaur limbs are explored and analyzed using comparative morphology and finite element analysis. Reconstruction of the forelimb and posture of Pinacosaurus grangeri matches well with trackways attributed to ankylosaurs. A flexed humerus angled away from the body, perpendicular radius and ulna, and upright metacarpus forming an arch proximally result in a crescent configuration of the manus, and a semi-supinated posture relative to the main axis of the body. The ankylosaurid metatarsus has a twisted proximal articular surface, metatarsals being optimally adapted for bearing weight at increasing angles, from medial to lateral. Metatarsal counts of Thyreophorans and other basal ornithischians do not match well with currently accepted phylogeny of these taxa, indicating that a revised phylogeny should be considered. Finite element analysis results, the twisted proximal articular surface, and other morphological features support a rolling motion in the foot while pushing off in locomotion. This is perhaps an adaptation to cope with the wide hips of ankylosaurids, bringing the pes closer to the midline of the animal during locomotion to increase maneuverability.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3MS3K89G
Rights
License granted by Robin Sissons (robin.sissons@gmail.com) on 2011-04-29T17:49:03Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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