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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QR4NS14

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Mixing characteristics of the Athabasca River below Fort McMurray – Winter Conditions Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Beltaos, S.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
AOSERP Report 40
Oilsands
Tar Sands
AOSERP WS 3.3
Athabasca River
Tarsands
Model
Alberta
AOSERP
Mixing Characterisctics
Oil Sands
Type of item
Report
Language
English
Place
Canada, Alberta, Fort McMurray
Time
Description
This report presents the results of a comprehensive assessment of mixing characteristics of the Athabasca River below Fort McMurray under ice-covered flow conditions. A brief review of mixing processes in natural streams is followed by a description of two tracer tests conducted in February 1978 to provide the necessary field documentation of the Athabasca River. The results of these tests are analysed using recent theoretical models available in the literature. An average value for the transverse mixing coefficient is determined from the results of the first test which was a steady state test. This coefficient compares favourably with that found from a preliminary test in 1974 under similar flow conditions. The results of the second test, which involved central injection of a slug, are compared with a one dimensional model developed earlier by the author. This model is shown to give fair predictions beyond 20 km from the injection site. It is suggested that this limiting distance be increased to about 80 km when side injection of a slug is considered. To model the results of the slug test within the first 20 km from injection, a numerical algorithm is utilized together with the mixing coefficient found from the first test and shown to give fair predictions. The effects of bars and islands on applications of this algorithm appear to be of localized nature. It is suggested that such effects be ignored unless pertinent hydrometric data are available in considerable detail. Practical applications of the present findings are illustrated by working out two hypothetical examples. Finally, some recommendations are made for future research required to completely define the mixing characteristics of the Athabasca River and Delta system.
Date created
1979
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3QR4NS14
License information
Rights
This material is provided under educational reproduction permissions included in Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development's Copyright and Disclosure Statement, see terms at http://www.environment.alberta.ca/copyright.html. This Statement requires the following identification: \"The source of the materials is Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development http://www.environment.gov.ab.ca/. The use of these materials by the end user is done without any affiliation with or endorsement by the Government of Alberta. Reliance upon the end user's use of these materials is at the risk of the end user.
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2014-04-28T20:44:34.137+00:00
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Filename: WS 3.3 Apr 1979.pdf
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