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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QQ5H

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Decision making in the NICU: the parents' perspective Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
parents
premature infants
NICU
neonates
decision making
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Pepper, Dawn
Supervisor and department
Rempel, Gwen (Faculty of Nursing)
Austin, Wendy (Faculty of Nursing)
Examining committee member and department
Rempel, Gwen (Faculty of Nursing)
Hendson, Leonora (Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry)
Austin, Wendy (Faculty of Nursing)
Ceci, Christine (Faculty of Nursing)
Department
Faculty of Nursing
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-08-27T18:34:31Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Nursing
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
There are different opinions on who the appropriate decision makers are for extremely premature infants. Some argue the responsibility should fall to the parents, and others argue the neonatal experts should be responsible for decision making. This study explored parental perceptions of their involvement in decision making in the neonatal intensive care (NICU). The NICU operated from the philosophy of Family Centered Care (FCC). FCC situates the parents as central to all aspects of their child’s care and as such, the parents should be well informed and actively involved in decision making. An interpretative descriptive approach was used to examine the experiences of seven parents who had infants born at 24-26 weeks gestation who were admitted to the NICU. Thematic analysis revealed that the culture of the NICU along with the relationships developed in the NICU had an impact on the parents’ perceptions of decision making.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3QQ5H
Rights
License granted by Dawn Pepper (jdpepper@shaw.ca) on 2009-08-27T15:48:51Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Thesis titlepage
File title: University of Alberta
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