ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Imagining english teaching through currere: an exploration of professional identity in high school english language arts teachersDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R32P58

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Imagining english teaching through currere: an exploration of professional identity in high school english language arts teachers Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Professional
English
Identity
Currere
Teacher
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McKeown, Brent William
Supervisor and department
Johnston, Ingrid (Secondary Education)
Examining committee member and department
Wiltse, Lynne (Elementary Education)
Iveson, Margaret (Secondary Education)
Department
Department of Secondary Education
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-08-28T19:40:59Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The overarching purpose of this study was to consider how high school English teachers’ perceptions of the challenges and joys of their profession revealed their underlying identity constructs and needs. This study also sought to explore the possibilities in utilizing William Pinar’s concept of currere as a means of exploring the concept of identity in this subject specific context and, ultimately, to consider whether currere could become a catalyst for meaningful change within the profession. The study combines both quantitative and qualitative methodology to explore two primary data sources:1) An open-ended survey of 56 high school English teachers and 2) A detailed discussion with 6 of the participants. The data collected through these two components of the study are filtered through the lens of the four stages of currere – regressive, progressive, analytical and synthetical – and draws on a range of theoretical discourses, including Narrative Inquiry and Lacanian Psychoanalysis.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R32P58
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-28T20:36:31.585+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1549278
Last modified: 2015:10:12 18:47:38-06:00
Filename: McKeown_Brent_Fall2011.pdf
Original checksum: dffe4b1c056c969a05489f57672b6a10
Well formed: true
Valid: true
Status message: Too many fonts to report; some fonts omitted. Total fonts = 1444
File author: EPS
Page count: 334
File language: en-US
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date