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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3V40K93H

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CANDIDATE GENES, METABOLITES AND BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS ASSOCIATED WITH RESIDUAL FEED INTAKE AND CARCASS QUALITY IN BEEF CATTLE Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Candidate genes
Residual feed intake
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Karisa, Brian K
Supervisor and department
Plastow, Graham (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Wang, Zhiquan (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Examining committee member and department
Bruce, Heather (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Goddard, Ellen (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Moore, Stephen (Centre for Animal Science - University of Queensland)
Wang, Zhiquan (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Plastow, Graham (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Zhao, Xin (Animal Science - McGill University)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization
Animal Science
Date accepted
2013-08-14T09:01:13Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to identify genes, DNA variants and plasma metabolites associated with residual feed intake (RFI) in beef cattle. In the first study, a total of 117 SNPs were selected and genotyped in 531 steers at the University of Alberta. The population was split into a discovery and validation population and multiple marker association analyses were performed in the discovery, validation and combined populations using ASReml. Twenty two SNPs were associated (P < 0.05) with RFI in the discovery population and 7 (of the 22) were also significant (P < 0.05) in the validation population. Twenty five SNPs were associated with RFI (P < 0.05) in the pooled population. A gene network analysis indicated that the biological processes associated with the significant genes included lipid, glucose, protein and steroid metabolism, growth, energy utilization, and regulation of DNA transcription and translation. The second study was an association analysis using the 117 SNPs and indicated that 7 were associated with various carcass quality traits (p ≤ 0.005) in the same population. A third association analysis was performed using steers at the University of Guelph, as the discovery population, to identify blood metabolites associated with RFI. Blood samples were collected at 3 periods with period 1, 2 and 3 corresponding to week 2, 6 and 9 into the feeding period respectively. Two, ten and three metabolites were significantly associated with RFI (P < 0.05) in period 1, 2 and 3 and accounted for 36%, 74% and 52% of the variation respectively. A validation analysis was performed using steers at the University of Alberta as the validation population. The results indicated that 3 metabolites were significantly associated with RFI in both discovery and validation populations accounting for 32.8% of the variation in the validation population. A metabolic network analysis indicated that the biological pathways associated with the metabolites included AMPK signaling, growth hormone signaling, lipid and energy metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. The genes, metabolites, biological networks and the biological pathways help contribute to a better understanding of the physiological processes influencing RFI and carcass quality in beef cattle.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3V40K93H
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Karisa, B. K, Moore, S. S, Plastow, G. S. Complicated relationships: A review of biological networks and pathways in animal science. Springer Science Reviews, 2013, DOI: 10.1007/s40362-013-0005-8B. K. Karisa, J. Thomson, Z. Wang, P. Stothard, S. S. Moore, G. S. Plastow. Candidate genes and single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with variation in residual feed intake in beef cattle. Journal of Animal Science; DOI:10.2527/jas.2012-6170.

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