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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3335Q

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The role of geometric and non-geometric environmental cues in reorientation: Pigeons’ and humans’ use of relative wall lengths, angular information, and features Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Angles
Features
Orientation
Spatial
Human
Pigeon
Geometry
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lubyk, Danielle M
Supervisor and department
Spetch, Marcia (Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Nicoladis, Elena (Psychology)
Sturdy, Christopher (Psychology)
Paszkowski, Cynthia (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-08-15T15:27:26Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The purpose of the following studies was to explore how humans and pigeons encode and use the geometric and featural information of their environments to orient and navigate. Chapters 1 and 2 examine the use of angular amplitude and relative wall length information in parallelogram-shaped enclosures by humans and pigeons. Results show that both species readily encode both cues in training and are able to use them individually to orient, but the angular information of the corners is weighted heavier than the relative wall lengths. Chapters 3 and 4 build upon these findings, using diamond-shaped enclosures and arrays to examine how orientation via angular amplitudes and features compare in the two environment types. Results indicate that both humans and pigeons can orient using either cue. However, the relative salience of the featural and angular information differs by species, environment type, and the amplitude of the goal angles.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3335Q
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Lubyk, D.M. & Spetch, M.L. (2012). Finding the best angle: pigeons (Columba livia) weight angular information more heavily than relative wall length in an open-field geometry task. Animal Cognition 15, 305-312. doi:10.1007/s10071-011-0454-xLubyk, D.M., Dupuis, B., Gutiérrez, L., & Spetch, M.L. (2012). Geometric orientation by humans: angles weigh in. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 19, 436-442. doi:10.3758/s13423-012-0232-z

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