ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Influence of forest canopies on the deposition of methylmercury to boreal ecosystem watershedsDownload the full-sized PDF

Actions

Download  |  Analytics

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Influence of forest canopies on the deposition of methylmercury to boreal ecosystem watersheds Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
mercury
methylmercury
canopy
wet-deposition
photoreduction
dry-deposition
boreal
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Mowat, Linnea
Supervisor and department
St. Louis, Vincent (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Wilson, John (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Cahill, James (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-05-31T15:43:35Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent vertebrate neurotoxin and a contaminant of global concern. Increased anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere have led to increased bioaccumulation of MeHg in top predatory organisms such as fish, the consumption of which is the main exposure pathway of this toxin to humans and other animals. Forest canopies significantly increase the deposition of Hg in general to watersheds, but sources and fates of MeHg deposition in particular remain poorly understood. In this study, wet and dry loadings of MeHg to a watershed were quantified, and the retention and (photo)reduction of MeHg on foliage were measured using unique stable isotope experiments. We found that traditional methods of quantifying net deposition underestimate incoming sources of MeHg, and that retention of MeHg on forest canopies results in delayed transport of a significant portion of newly deposited MeHg from terrestrial catchments into adjacent lakes.
Language
English
Rights
License granted by Linnea Mowat (ldmowat@ualberta.ca) on 2010-05-31T15:18:51Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-30T22:39:07.780+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1788749
Last modified: 2015:10:12 12:46:24-06:00
Filename: Mowat_Linnea_Fall 2010.pdf
Original checksum: 901a4b6a4cc41510e57d35bc08086cca
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Chapter 1. General Introduction
File title: University of Alberta
File author: Linnea Mowat
Page count: 75
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date