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T cell-mediated inflammation is stereotyped: mouse delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and mouse T cell-mediated rejection of renal allografts share common molecular mechanismsT cell-mediated inflammation is stereotyped Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Allograft
Gene-expression
Rejection
Hapten
Inflammation
Hypersensitivity
Interferon
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Venner, Jeffery
Supervisor and department
Halloran, Philip (Medicine)
Mengel, Michael (Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Examining committee member and department
Anderson, Colin (Surgery)
Department
Medicine
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-30T16:42:42Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Genome-wide gene expression analysis of diseases has revealed large-scale changes in the expression of thousands of genes (transcripts) representing biological processes. The processes that occur during T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) of renal allografts in mice and humans have been previously delineated, and they appear to be independent of cytotoxic mechanisms; thus, TCMR is analogous to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). Since TCMR and DTH involve similar mechanisms, we hypothesized the molecular changes in TCMR are stereotyped; thus, they are qualitatively the same as those in DTH. Using microarrays to compare the transcript expression changes of both diseases in mice, we found they share the same processes: T cell and macrophage infiltration, IFNG-effects, alternative macrophage activation, and a coordinated injury-repair response of the tissue parenchyma. Additional analysis revealed IFNG is vital for stabilizing the injury-repair response in TCMR and DTH. We conclude the molecular changes in TCMR and DTH involve stereotyped, coordinated processes.
Language
English
Rights
License granted by Jeffery Venner (venner@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-29T14:51:30Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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