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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3199P

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“All of Our Secrets are in These Mountains”: Problematizing Colonial Power Relations, Tourism Productions and Histories of the Cultural Practices of Nakoda Peoples in the Banff-Bow Valley Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Postcolonial
Race
History
Poststructuralism
Banff
Foucault
Aboriginal
Identity
Technologies
Politics
Sport
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Mason, Courtney Wade
Supervisor and department
Shogan, Debra (Physical Education and Recreation)
Examining committee member and department
Hinch, Tom (Physical Education and Recreation)
Markula, Pirkko (Physical Education and Recreation)
Brown, Doug (Kinesiology)
Palmer, Andie (Anthropology)
Department
Physical Education and Recreation
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-10-01T15:26:13Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
This study examines some of the significant challenges that Nakoda peoples encountered from 1870-1980 in the Banff-Bow Valley, Alberta. Beginning with missionary movements, the 1877 Treaty Seven agreements and the establishment of the reservation systems, I trace the emergence of a disciplinary power regime and the subsequent consequences for Nakoda communities. Canadian governments and agents of the colonial bureaucracy manipulated time, space and movement which altered the structure of Aboriginal lives in ways that attempted to increase visibility, economic productivity and docility. Race as a normalizing and dividing practice (Foucault, 1975) is used to demonstrate how levels of discipline furthered assimilation strategies through the formation of Canada’s first national park and the development of the region’s tourism economies. As the preeminent example of the engagement of Nakoda peoples in local tourism industries, the Banff Indian Days sporting and cultural festivals, which were celebrated from 1894-1978, are also investigated. Borrowing from poststructural and postcolonial theory, the interactions between tourists, participants, organizers and performers are problematized. It is revealed that the festivals became critical sites of cultural exchange that engendered unique socio-economic, political and cultural opportunities. In addition, the Indian Days fostered important identity-making possibilities and crucial spaces to assert, contest, and produce perceptions of Aboriginal cultures. This research privileges information obtained from oral history interviews with Nakoda peoples. However, archival materials, mainly newspaper accounts, photographs, tourism advertisements, and government documents also contribute to the primary evidence collected. As well as analyzing racial discourse, this work also considers how Nakoda peoples responded to the representations and expectations that informed the production of Aboriginal identities. I conclude this study by suggesting that it is crucial for researchers to consult diverse Aboriginal perspectives and collaborate with the communities within which they work. This research offers new understandings of the cultural histories of the Banff-Bow Valley which reflect the dynamic and complex nature of colonial power relations.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3199P
Rights
License granted by Courtney Mason (cwmason@ualberta.ca) on 2010-09-30T21:02:55Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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