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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3H98ZN36

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Theses and Dissertations

Development of a Prototype for a Low Dead Time Dark Matter Detector using Superheated Liquid Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
geyser
low dead time
superheated liquid
dark matter
PICASSO
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Mitra, Pitam
Supervisor and department
Krauss, Carsten
Examining committee member and department
Pogosyan, Dimitri
Grant, Darren
Department
Department of Physics
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-05-14T13:48:42Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
PICASSO (Project in Canada to Search for Supersymmetric Objects) is a direct dark matter search experiment located at SNOLAB. PICASSO uses su- perheated Freon-10 (C4 F10 ) as target for elastic scattering of Weakly Interact- ing Massive Particles (WIMPs) which are the most favored particle candidates for dark matter. In this thesis, a “geyser”, a small-scale working prototype of a low dead-time dark matter detector, is described. This detector has a novel design for the recovery of the active fluid. It is demonstrated that the detector can stably sustain superheated fluid for more than 48 hours. Systematic studies have been performed of the stability, the dead time, energy thresholds and the operational parameters of the geyser. The geyser was operated stably for more than 73 hours, out of which 40 hours of thermodynamic, optical and acoustic data were analysed. An image analysis algorithm was developed to localize events. Acoustic data was analyzed using techniques from the PICASSO experiment. A strong discrimination effect between alpha-like events and nuclear recoil-like events was found.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3H98ZN36
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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