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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3GB1XR21

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Ways of Decision-Making Used in the Care Decisions of Individuals with Dementia Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
rural
preferences
decision-making
care decision
decision making
dementia
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Thiessen, Emily J.
Supervisor and department
Dr. Dorothy Forbes, Faculty of Nursing
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Wendy Duggleby, Faculty of Nursing
Dr. Lisa Cranley, Faculty of Nursing
Dr. Belinda Parke, Faculty of Nursing
Department
Faculty of Nursing
Specialization

Date accepted
2014-08-11T11:45:41Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Nursing
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
An understanding of the ways that rural community dwelling individuals with dementia (IWDs) are, and prefer to be, involved in their decision-making could help caregivers maximize IWDs’ contribution to their decisions and could thus improve their care. This qualitative secondary analysis used an interpretive descriptive approach to inductively analyze 30 semi-structured interviews, which included 5 IWDs and their 6 informal caregivers (ICGs). Interviews were conducted over a year at the baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Five ways of decision-making were identified: (a) independent, (b) collaborative, (c) guided, (d) delegated, and (e) directed. Contrary to IWDs’ preference for independent decision-making, they most often made guided decisions. Guided decision-making was used when IWDs did not recognize their need to make the specified decision, and when the IWD or their ICG perceived that the IWD needed guidance in their decision. Involvement of IWDs in their decision-making was maximized when their decisions were guided.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3GB1XR21
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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