ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Colloid Deposition and Aggregation in the Presence of Charged CollectorsDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3HQ3S660

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Colloid Deposition and Aggregation in the Presence of Charged Collectors Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
deposition
ion release
polystyrene
aggregation
straining
Colloidal particles
glass beads
collector
column experiment
batch experiment
mixing
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Sadri, Behnam
Supervisor and department
Rajendran, Arvind (Chemical Engineering)
Fleck, Brian (Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Zeng, Hongbo (Chemical Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-01-29T10:40:21Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Colloidal-collector interactions are of fundamental importance in separation and filtration technologies. Here, the effect of collector grains on the behavior of colloidal particles was studied in two different experimental systems, i.e., column studies with stationary collectors and batch mixing to study hetero aggregation. Polystyrene latex beads, 100 nm diameter, and soda lime glass beads, with two different diameters of 212-300 $\mu$m and 710-1180 $\mu$m, were employed as colloidal particles and collector grains, respectively. Column experiments were performed to understand fate of colloidal particles in the porous medium. There are three major phenomena that control colloidal transport in porous media: Deposition, aggregation, and straining. These three distinct types of particle dynamics in porous media were studied by adjusting physicochemical properties of colloidal suspension. Furthermore, the effect of washing the collector beads was studied. Batch experiments, in which known amount of collector grains are added to colloidal suspension with known concentration, are designed to investigate more collector-colloids interaction role in transport dynamics of colloidal particles. UV-Vis spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques are employed to understand both deposition and aggregation of colloidal particles in the vicinity of collector grains. Results obtained by dynamic light scattering revealed that aggregation is the predominant factor in this colloidal system. The possible sources for this type of behavior are also tackled by undertaking controlled experiments. In the batch experiments, ions leaching from the surface of glass beads, effect of mixing, and glass beads presence are confirmed as the three major reasons behind the aggregation of colloidal particles.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3HQ3S660
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2015-06-15T07:06:14.669+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (PDF/A)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 9118450
Last modified: 2015:10:21 23:52:33-06:00
Filename: Sadri_Behnam_201501_MSc.pdf
Original checksum: ed11df5f6fe013d93f576b64a6892f7d
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date