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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QW23

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Physics simulations and their influence on conceptual change in students Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
concept maps
conceptual change
constructivism
engagement
simulations
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Marcellus, Kenneth
Supervisor and department
Nocente, Norma (Secondary Education)
Examining committee member and department
Barker, Susan (Secondary Education)
Pegg, Jerine (Elementary Education)
Department
Department of Secondary Education
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-26T16:33:21Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This research was designed to determine what conceptual changes occur when students use computer simulations, and whether simulations with characteristics defined as engaging by Adams et al. (2008a; 2008b), Granlund, Berglund, and Eriksson (2000), Kali and Linn (2008), Kim, Yoon, Whang, Tversky, and Morrison (2007), Lowe (2004), Malone (1981), and Wishart (1990), seem to promote conceptual change. Six grade-ten students worked with three projectile-motion simulations in various orders. Students drew pre- and post-treatment concept maps, their interactions with the simulations were videotaped, and they were interviewed. The results show that the students did experience conceptual change, but the changes were mostly within existing cognitive frameworks with few higher-order connections made. As well, the simulation that engaged the students the most promoted the least conceptual change, and vice versa. These findings support recommendations made in earlier literature that raise awareness of simulation features that tend to distract students from learning goals.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3QW23
Rights
License granted by Kenneth Marcellus (kgm3@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-23T17:42:42Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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