ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Early Nineteenth-Century Vampire Literature and the Rejection of Enlightenment RationalismDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VP41

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Early Nineteenth-Century Vampire Literature and the Rejection of Enlightenment Rationalism Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Vampires
Enlightenment
Voltaire
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Dalton, Andrew BJ
Supervisor and department
Gow, Andrew (Department of History and Classics)
Examining committee member and department
Zivkovic, Marko (Department of Anthropology)
Brown, Sylvia (Department of English and Film Studies)
Sweeney, Dennis (Department of History and Classics)
Coleman, Heather (Department of History and Classics)
Caradonna, Jeremy (Department of History and Classics)
Department
Department of History and Classics
Specialization
History
Date accepted
2012-08-09T14:32:41Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis argues that early nineteenth-century vampire literature rejected the Enlightenment’s attempts to rationalize and explain away the early eighteenth-century vampire craze. Enlightenment scholars of the eighteenth century rationalized famous vampire accounts to dispel supernatural beliefs in the Age of Reason. Through an examination of the tales of John Polidori, Lord Byron, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Johann Ludwig Tieck, Théophile Gautier, and Aleksei Tolstoy this research reveals that they used the central themes of early eighteenth-century vampire accounts in conjunction with Enlightenment vampire metaphors to reject Enlightenment rationalism. Furthermore, the vampire was contemporized in the nineteenth century as an aristocratic evil, providing an escape for readers from their current reality by returning to the realm of the supernatural. This thesis follows the reader response approach focusing on early eighteenth-century vampire accounts, Enlightenment scholarship that rationalized supernatural beliefs, and the contents and consumption of early nineteenth-century vampire tales.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3VP41
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-29T21:32:24.300+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 734690
Last modified: 2015:10:12 19:59:57-06:00
Filename: Dalton_Andrew_Fall 2012.pdf
Original checksum: e9c8b6edff2a5c43d49f58fe4e483cb8
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File author: Andrew
Page count: 92
File language: en-CA
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date