ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Evaluation of the impact of contaminant on trace metal content of compostDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R38C85

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Evaluation of the impact of contaminant on trace metal content of compost Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
composting
compost
comtaminant
metal
MSW
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Zhou, Lixian
Supervisor and department
McCartney, Daryl (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Felske, Christian (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Chen, Weixing (Chemical and Materials Engineering)
Department
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-01-25T21:58:48Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Literature reviews indicated that batteries, ferrous, non-ferrous materials, and electronic products are major contributors of trace metals in municipal solid waste (MSW). In order to assess the impact of various contaminants on the trace metal content of compost, contaminants including alkaline batteries, galvanized nails, Zn-plated screws, copper wires and electronic cables were exposed to a thermophilic composting process for three weeks. The increase in trace metal content in the compost product was measured, after the composting process. The results showed that the main contributors of trace metals are copper wires and galvanized nails. They contributed 51.9% of the CCME A limit for copper and 29.5% of the CCME A limit for zinc, respectively. To ensure the compost quality reaches the CCME category A criteria, contaminants made from bare copper or coated with zinc should be removed from the composting feedstock as much as possible.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R38C85
Rights
License granted by Lixian Zhou (lixian@ualberta.ca) on 2010-01-22T19:13:49Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T04:14:49.392+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 2934537
Last modified: 2015:10:12 21:01:22-06:00
Filename: Zhou_Lixian_Spring 2010.pdf
Original checksum: 48cead792632706aa03c7b333dc90b78
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Microsoft Word - 4B59E116-4EBA-0821E5.doc
File author: www
Page count: 157
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date