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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3X12B

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The Domain Specificity of Perfectionism in Varsity Athletes Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
perceived competence
sport
perfectionism
athletes
perceived importance
intercollegiate
school
domain-specific
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McDonald, Keith A
Supervisor and department
Dunn, John (Physical Education and Recreation)
Examining committee member and department
Hickson, Clive (Education)
Holt, Nicholas (Physical Education and Recreation)
Department
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-22T17:03:46Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study examined the domain-specific nature of perfectionism in the contexts of sport and academe among a sample of 113 female and 142 male intercollegiate varsity student-athletes. Participants completed self-report measures of domain-specific perfectionism, perceived competence (PC), and perceived importance (PI) of success. A repeated-measures MANOVA revealed that, on average, student-athletes had significantly higher levels of perfectionism in sport than in school/academe (all ps < .0001). Separate single sample t-tests for PC and PI showed the participants had, on average, significantly higher levels of PC and PI in sport than in school (ps < .001). Bivariate correlation analyses revealed that, in general, as domain-specific PC and PI increased so too did domain-specific perfectionism. Results reinforce the value of measuring perfectionism as a domain-specific (rather than global) personality disposition, and that perceived competence and perceived importance (i.e., perceived task value) may be associated with the development of domain-specific perfectionism.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3X12B
Rights
License granted by Keith McDonald (keith1@ualberta.ca) on 2010-09-16T15:48:09Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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Last modified: 2015:10:12 14:48:28-06:00
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File author: Keith McDonald
Page count: 138
File language: en-CA
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