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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34J0B56W

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Relationships among diverse root foraging behaviours: understanding plant behavioural types Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Behaviour
Root foraging
Belowground
Competition
Behavioural type
Plant behaviour
Root placement
Behavioural syndrome
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Belter, Pamela R.
Supervisor and department
Cahill, James (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Hall, Jocelyn (Biological Sciences)
Manson, Jessamyn (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2014-03-27T09:14:56Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Behaviours capture the functional response of plants to environmental factors. I explore behaviours for twenty co-occurring grassland species in response to common belowground environmental factors (competition, mycorrhizae, heterogeneous and high nutrients) and their relationship to plant outcomes. First, detailed plant response to neighbours was observed using a specialized apparatus which allowed for visualization of the root system in situ. Species varied in response from strongly aggregating to strongly segregating roots by adjusting overall size and occupation of the soil and/or by altering allocation to roots and the specific placement of roots. In the second study, associations among response to nutrients, mycorrhizae, neighbours, foraging precision, and soil exploration behaviours created behavioural types along two axes: assertiveness and focus. However, neither individual behaviours nor behavioural types influenced plant growth overall. Together, these results suggest the complexity of belowground behaviours and the need to consider associations among behaviours across contexts. See  http://hdl.handle.net/10402/era.38312
for supporting data files.

Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34J0B56W
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Pamela Ricca Belter
File author: Pamela
Page count: 122
File language: en-CA
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