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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3S17T04V

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Dissolving Identity: Becoming-Imperceptible in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Identity
Virginia Woolf
Mrs Dalloway
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lypka, Celiese T.
Supervisor and department
Wallace, Jo-Ann (English)
Examining committee member and department
Chisholm, Dianne (English)
Wallin, Jason (Education)
Department
Department of English and Film Studies
Specialization
English
Date accepted
2014-09-17T14:50:26Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis identifies and explores a literary and theoretical correlation between Virginia Woolf’s “moments of being” and Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of “becoming.” It does this by examining the total deconstruction of identity in Woolf’s fourth novel, Mrs Dalloway. Through her protagonist Clarissa Dalloway, a woman torn between her constructed external self and an internal desire to be united with the universe, and Clarissa’s working-class double Septimus Warren Smith, Woolf explored new methods of composing literary representations of being. In this thesis, I implement Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s literary philosophical work from A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, to develop a new vocabulary for discussing the tensions that underlie Woolf’s characteristically elusive writing style. Using Deleuzian terminology – a terminology that accepts an open-ended writing style and that does not require pinning down Woolf’s intentions – allows for an examination of the dissolving character, “becoming imperceptible,” of Clarissa at the novel’s end. This consideration of Mrs. Dalloway demonstrates the ways in which Deleuze’s philosophy can expand our understanding of Virginia Woolf’s poetics of the novel.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3S17T04V
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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