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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3BP7H

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The free improvised music scene in Beirut: Negotiating identities and stimulating social transformation in an era of political conflict Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
free improvised music
identity
Beirut
social transformation
political conflict
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
El Kadi, Rana
Supervisor and department
Frishkopf, Michael (Music)
Examining committee member and department
Spinetti, Federico (Music)
Mahdavi, Mojtaba (Political Science)
Qureshi, Regula (Music)
Department
Department of Music
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-02-02T20:54:42Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Although free improvised music (FIM) originated in Europe and the United States in the 1960s, it has come to possess meanings and roles unique to its individual contexts of production in today’s transnational scene. By focusing on the Lebanese free improvised music scene which emerged in Beirut in 2000, my study aims to address the gap in scholarship on Lebanese expressive culture, particularly music, as a tool to negotiate identity. My thesis addresses the way FIM in Lebanon allows four musicians of the “war generation” (Mazen Kerbaj, Sharif Sehnaoui, Bechir Saade, and Raed Yassin) to express their individual identities as well as their complex relationship with conflict. I propose that, in a society still coming to terms with the atrocities of civil war and constant political instability, the practice of FIM may have a role in reflecting conflict, facilitating inter-cultural dialogue, as well as breaking aesthetic, socio-economic, and sectarian barriers.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3BP7H
Rights
License granted by Rana El Kadi (alkadi@ualberta.ca) on 2010-01-29T20:46:58Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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