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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3ZK55M89

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Growth of aspen and white spruce on naturally saline sites in northern Alberta: implications for development of boreal forest vegetation on reclaimed saline soils. Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Lilles, E.B.
Purdy, B.G.
Macdonald, S.E.
Chang, S.X.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
salt tolerance
forest growth
boreal forest
reclamation
salinity gradient
stem analysis
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
We examined height and basal area growth over time for trembling aspen and white spruce in plots along a salinity gradient at six naturally saline sites in northern Alberta, as a benchmark for forest productivity on reclaimed saline sites. We measured root distributions and analyzed foliage for ions, nutrients and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios. Both species grew on soil conditions previously considered unsuitable for forest vegetation [pH>8.5; electrical conductivity>10 dS m−1, sodium adsorption ratio>13 at depth (50–100 cm)] yet there was little evidence of nutritional toxicities or deficiencies. Aspen basal area growth decreased 50% as salinity increased, but aspen was commercially productive (site index=22) on soils with electrical conductivity of 7.8 dS m−1 at 50–100 cm depth. Growth of white spruce seemed to be unaffected by salinity level differences, but 78% of white spruce site indexes were less than 13 and would be considered non-productive. Both species showed growth declines over time, compared with non-saline reference growth curves, and rooted primarily in the forest floor and top 20 cm of soil. This suggests that rooting limitations may constrain longer-term productivity of forests established on sites with salinity at depth.
Date created
2012
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3ZK55M89
License information
Rights
© 2012 Agricultural Institute of Canada. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
Citation for previous publication
Lilles, E. B., Purdy, B. G., Macdonald, S. E. and Chang, S. X. 2012. Growth of aspen and white spruce on naturally saline sites in northern Alberta: Implications for development of boreal forest vegetation on reclaimed saline soils. Can. J. Soil Sci. 92: 213–227.
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