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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3HM47

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Early Ecosystem Genesis Using LFH And Peat Cover Soils In Athabasca Oil Sands Reclamation Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Cover soil
Boreal forest
Plant community development
Seed bank
Reclamation
Oil sands
Early ecosystem genesis
Bare areas
Revegetation
Species diversity
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Archibald, Heather Anne
Supervisor and department
Naeth, M. Anne (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Macdonald, Ellen (Renewable Resources)
Chanasyk, David (Renewable Resources)
Ramirez, Guillermo Hernandez (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Land Reclamation and Remediation
Date accepted
2014-01-23T11:55:02Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Peat mineral soil mix has been the predominant cover soil used in Athabasca oil sands reclamation. Use of LFH mineral soil mix (forest litter layers and underlying mineral soil) has recently been mandated by regulatory approvals. Effectiveness of these cover soil types to provide diverse, native plant communities long term was compared at four research sites four to thirteen years of age. LFH mineral soil mix produced significantly greater woody plant density, vascular plant species richness, native species richness, total cover and native species cover; peat mineral soil mix had significantly higher non-native (weed) species cover. Species composition, growth form assemblage and dominant species differed between cover soils. LFH mineral soil mix is a superior cover soil to peat mineral soil mix for native plant community development. Patches of bare soil on both cover soils had significantly different soil chemical and physical properties than soil at patches of diverse vegetation.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3HM47
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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