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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30D81

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The functional characterization of the SnRK1 protein complex in hybrid poplar Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
SnRK1
dormancy
nitrogen
poplar
expression profile
AKINgamma
AKINbeta
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lam, Kimberley SW
Supervisor and department
Cooke, Janice (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Deyholos, Michael (Biological Sciences)
Ozga, Jocelyn (Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences)
Hall, Jocelyn (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-28T19:56:11Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The sucrose-nonfermenting-1 related kinase 1 (SnRK1) protein complex is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase complex conserved in eukaryotes that acts as a regulator of carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis. The objective of this study was to determine if the SnRK1 protein complex has a role in the nitrogen response and during dormancy acquisition in poplar. Gene expression profiling of the PtdSnRK1, PtdAKINbeta, and PtdAKINgamma gene family members was carried out using a robust qRT-PCR assay. A subset of these genes showed modified expression patterns under differential nitrogen availability and during dormancy acquisition, suggesting that SnRK1 complexes comprised of specific subunits may be involved in the regulation of the response to nitrogen and during dormancy acquisition. The regulatory subunits PtdAKINbeta1.1, PtdAKINgamma1.1 and PtdAKINgamma2.3 were often identified using principal component analysis as significantly responsible for distinguishing treatments from one another and therefore merit further study.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30D81
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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