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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3R20S701

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An Objective Method for Identifying Heat-Treatment in Swan River Chert Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Swan River Chert
Heat-Treatment
Objective
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Stewart, Peter Nicholas Bering
Supervisor and department
Ives, Jack (Anthropology)
Examining committee member and department
Nychka, John (Engineering)
Ives, Jack (Anthropology)
Willoughby, Pamela (Anthropology)
Gruhn, Ruth (Anthropology)
Department
Department of Anthropology
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-08-22T16:20:54Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Current models for determining when stone artifacts have been heat- treated rely on subjective criteria such as colour and texture. While these criteria are not without their own merits, their subjective nature means that the actual amount of heat-treated material at an archaeological site may be over- or underestimated. This study provides a potential model for objectively identifying heat-treatment in Swan River Chert. The model utilizes a device called an optical profilometer to measure the topography of a flake’s ventral surface and is supported by an experimental protocol. The ability to determine objectively when lithics have been heat-treated has the potential to further our understanding of lithic acquisition and reduction strategies in Alberta. The identification model was applied to a series of experimentally heat-treated flakes as well as lithic material from eight archaeological sites in Alberta that date from the Middle to Late Prehistoric periods and it was discovered that heat-treated flakes have a smoother flake surface when compared to unheated flakes.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3R20S701
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Thesis Final Draft
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