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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3J16F

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Do nonexercisers also share the positive exerciser stereotype? An elicitation and comparison of beliefs about exercisers Open Access

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Author or creator
Rodgers, W. M.
Hall, C. R.
Wilson, P. M.
Berry, T. R.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Activity levels
Beliefs
Physical activity
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
The purpose of this research was to examine whether exercisers and nonexercisers are rated similarly on a variety of characteristics by a sample of randomly selected regular exercisers, nonexercisers who intend to exercise, and nonexercisers with no intention to exercise. Previous research by Martin Ginis et al. (2003) has demonstrated an exerciser stereotype that advantages exercisers. It is unknown, however, the extent to which an exerciser stereotype is shared by nonexercisers, particularly nonintenders. Following an item-generation procedure, a sample of 470 (n = 218 men; n = 252 women) people selected using random digit dialing responded to a questionnaire assessing the extent to which they agreed that exercisers and nonexercisers possessed 24 characteristics, such as \"happy,\" \"fit,\" \"fat,\" and \"lazy.\" The results strongly support a positive exerciser bias, with exercisers rated more favorably on 22 of the 24 items. The degree of bias was equivalent in all groups of respondents. Examination of the demographic characteristics revealed no differences among the three groups on age, work status, or child-care responsibilities, suggesting that there is a pervasive positive exerciser bias.
Date created
2009
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3J16F
License information
Rights
© 2009 Human Kinetics. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
Citation for previous publication
Rodgers, W. M., Hall, C. R., Wilson, P. M., & Berry, T. R. (2009). Do nonexercisers also share the positive exerciser stereotype? An elicitation and comparison of beliefs about exercisers. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 31(1), 3-17.
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