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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3C10M

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Development of KMPR-Based Microfluidic Structures for Use in LOC Systems Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Thin Film Heaters
KMPR
LOC
Microfluidics
Microfabrication
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Reynolds, Matthew
Supervisor and department
Sameoto, Dan (Department of Mechanical Engineering)
Backhouse, Chris (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo)
Elliott, Duncan (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Elias, Anastasia (Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering)
Sit, Jeremy (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Department
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Specialization
Biomedical Engineering
Date accepted
2014-03-25T15:22:33Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Lab-on-chip systems will be a major component in the future of health care. These technologies enable point-of-care testing by miniaturizing and improving the efficiency of many diagnostic techniques. Possible applications include the detection of various pathogens using genetic amplification and analysis techniques. Ideally, a system should provide rapid sample-in-answer-out capabilities without requiring a patient to leave their own home. The goal of this thesis is to advance lab-on-chip manufacturing technologies by using the epoxy-based photopolymer KMPR with the eventual goal of integrating lab-on-chip devices with CMOS technology. In order to produce integrated microfluidics using this material the physical properties of KMPR and the effect of changing processing conditions on those properties was studied. Following this devices were developed consisting of polymeric microfluidic structures (channels, wells and chambers) and integrated metal thin film structures such as heaters and electrodes. Validation of the fabricated devices was performed in order to confirm their operation.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3C10M
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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