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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3TW6J

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Active open-loop control of a backward-facing step flow Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
vorticity
tuft
actuation
separation
turbulent
backward-facing step
open-loop
visualization
spanwise-varying
reattachment
shear layer
active control
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Baugh, Aaron R
Supervisor and department
Sigurdson, Lorenz (Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Loewen, Mark (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Toogood, Roger (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-30T17:31:01Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
A robotically-controlled actuation system has been developed and built to perform active open-loop flow control experiments on transitional and turbulent backward-facing step flows in water. Control of the reattaching shear layer used hydraulic suction-and-blowing actuation emanating from 128 individual ports along the separation edge of the step. Each port’s perturbation was periodic in time, but individually controlled to produce either spanwise-invariant (2D) or spanwise-varying (3D) spatial actuation profiles. An image processing system and special aqueous tuft were developed to measure the length of the recirculation bubble. Multiple images of a tuft array were time-averaged to do so. In general, 3D forcing was no more effective in reducing bubble length than 2D forcing. However, greater local spanwise reductions in reattachment length were observed for some cases of spanwise-varying forcing. Backlit dye was used to track the evolution of vorticity in the flow in video and still images.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3TW6J
Rights
License granted by Aaron Baugh (abaugh@ualberta.ca) on 2010-08-26T22:08:22Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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