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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30863D7W

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Effect of dried distillers’ grains with solubles on greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
methane
beef cattle
dried distillers grains with solubles
nitrogen excretion
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Hünerberg, Martin
Supervisor and department
Dr. Erasmus K. Okine, Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta/ Dr. Tim A. McAllister, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge and Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Karen A. Beauchemin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge
Dr. John D. Wilson, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta
Dr. Sean M. McGinn, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge
Dr. Kris Johnson, Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, USA
Dr. Masahito Oba, Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization
Animal Science
Date accepted
2013-10-29T13:44:46Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
Four experiments were conducted to determine the impact of dried distillers’ grains with solubles (DDGS) on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from beef cattle. The first compared in vitro methane (CH4) production from corn DDGS (CDDGS, ~30% crude protein [CP]) and wheat DDGS (WDDGS, ~40% CP dry matter [DM]). Wheat DDGS or CDDGS replaced barley silage at 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% DM. Methane (mg CH4/g DM) was lower for CDDGS than WDDGS at up to 80% DM. In a second experiment, heifers fed a growing (high silage) diet showed a reduction in CH4 (g CH4/kg DM intake [DMI]) when 35% barley grain and 5% canola meal DM were replaced with CDDGS (10.0% fat DM). Inclusion of 40% WDDGS (4.1% fat DM) had no effect on enteric CH4 emissions. In contrast, feeding 40% DM WDDGS with added corn oil (9.5% fat DM) reduced CH4 to the same extent as CDDGS. In a third experiment, replacing 40% DM barley grain with CDDGS (9.7% fat DM) in a finishing (high grain) diet reduced CH4 (g/kg DMI). Whereas feeding 40% DM WDDGS along with corn oil (9.9% fat DM) resulted in similar CH4 losses as CDDGS. Results from both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that the higher fat content of CDDGS vs. WDDGS was responsible for CH4 reductions. The benefit of replacing 40% DM barley grain with CDDGS or WDDGS on GHG emissions from beef production was further evaluated using life cycle assessment. Replacing barley grain with CDDGS or WDDGS increased N intake and subsequently N excretion. Increased N excretion was predicted to outweigh reductions in CH4 through increased formation of nitrous oxide (N2O). Therefore, feeding CDDGS and WDDGS resulted in 6.3 and 9.3% higher GHG intensity (kg CO2 equivalent [CO2e]/kg beef) compared to the control. To reduce the environmental impact, DDGS should not be fed at inclusion levels that exceed N requirements of feedlot cattle.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30863D7W
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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