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Chinese Immigrants’ use of Human Services During the Transition to Parenthood Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
pregnancy
transition to parenthood
human services
immigrant
experiences
Chinese
service utilization
Canada
qualitative research
infants
health care
mothers
parents
fathers
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Svechnikova, Ksenia
Supervisor and department
Williamson, Deanna (Human Ecology)
Examining committee member and department
Kaysi Kushner (Nursing)
Maria Mayan (Extension)
Department
Department of Human Ecology
Specialization
Family Ecology and Practice
Date accepted
2012-01-05T10:34:03Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore Chinese immigrants’ experiences with human services during the transition to parenthood. The data were generated through three rounds of individual interviews with six Chinese immigrant couples. Latent content analysis was used to identify primary patterns in the types and prevalence of services used by participants, their reasons for using human services, and the quality of their experiences with the services. The findings indicate that participants commonly used (a wide range of) health care services, while social services were not commonly used. When participants sought help from human services, it was mostly for their infants’ health-related issues. Overall, participants’ experiences with human services were positive. Services seemed to meet participants’ needs, providers were perceived as pleasant to interact with and most were easy to access. Finally, a language barrier to services was not a common experience for participants.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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