ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Effect of heavy load carriage on respiratory mechanics and breathing pattern during graded exerciseDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3D30M

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Effect of heavy load carriage on respiratory mechanics and breathing pattern during graded exercise Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
load carriage
exercise
respiratory
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lesser, Iris Aline
Supervisor and department
Petersen, Stewart (Physical Education and Recreation)
Examining committee member and department
Stickland, Michael (Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry)
Hodges, Alastair (Physical Education and Recreation)
Department
Physical Education and Recreation
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-31T14:11:16Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The effect of heavy load carriage on pulmonary function at rest and on breathing pattern and lung volumes during graded exercise was studied. Fifteen males completed treadmill tests to measure VO2peak with and without a 25-kg pack. Subsequently, each subject completed short periods of treadmill walking in loaded and unloaded conditions at intensities equivalent to 55, 65, 75 and 85% of VO2peak. At rest, in the loaded condition, forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) both were reduced by 3% with no change in FEV1/FVC. During exercise with the pack, tidal volume (VT) and end-inspiratory lung volume (EILV) were reduced by 14 and 5%, respectively, while ventilation (VE) was maintained by a 9% increase in breathing frequency (Bf). Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was always higher during the loaded trial, despite identical oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) responses. During graded exercise under heavy load up to 85% of VO2peak, breathing pattern is altered to maintain VE while respiratory mechanics were not altered.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3D30M
Rights
License granted by Iris Lesser (lesser@ualberta.ca) on 2010-08-30T18:06:36Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-24T23:24:05.111+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 791752
Last modified: 2015:10:12 18:32:42-06:00
Filename: Lesser_Iris_Fall2010.pdf
Original checksum: b27654e5e4f322ac9d02f079f928e4c2
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Research questions:
File author: workphys
Page count: 90
File language: en-US
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date