ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of TB, HIV, and TB/HIV co-infection: Community Knowledge and Stigma in Western UgandaDownload the full-sized PDF

Actions

Download  |  Analytics

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

TB, HIV, and TB/HIV co-infection: Community Knowledge and Stigma in Western Uganda Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Knowledge
HIV
Stigma
Uganda
Tuberculosis
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Wynne, Ashley KM
Supervisor and department
Kipp, Walter (Public Health Sciences)
Richter, Solina (Nursing)
Examining committee member and department
Houston, Stan (Public Health Sciences, Medicine)
Jhangri, Gian (Public Health Sciences)
Department
School Public Health Sciences
Specialization
Global Health
Date accepted
2012-01-28T06:57:18Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The threat of Tuberculosis(TB) cannot be considered in isolation from the HIV/AIDS epidemic. This study assessed knowledge and stigma surrounding TB and HIV co-infection in Kabarole district, Uganda. This cross-sectional mixed methods study used a multi stage survey design (n=360) and focus groups discussions. Mean knowledge scores were 58% for HIV, 33% for TB and 48% for TB/HIV. Percentage classified as having high stigma were 26% for HIV, 47% for TB, and 21% for co-infection. Education predicted higher HIV knowledge, co-infection knowledge, and lower TB stigma. TB knowledge was predicted by rural residence, and age ≥45years. Those who had an HIV+ friend had lower HIV stigma. Respondents believed that TB was transmitted by sharing cups, smoking, and that TB was not curable. Fear of TB is driven by the assumption that “TB means HIV”. TB knowledge is low and stigma is high, TB awareness campaigns should be a priority.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-29T17:48:15.344+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1093752
Last modified: 2015:10:12 19:10:54-06:00
Filename: Wynne_Ashley_June 2012.pdf
Original checksum: 96ff6d7cf7f1e9095d6817459331017e
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File author: wynne
Page count: 97
File language: en-CA
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date