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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R37Q4S

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Cougar response to roads and predatory behaviour in southwestern Alberta Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
Roads
Predation
Cougar
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Banfield, Jeremiah E
Supervisor and department
Boyce, Mark (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Schindler, David (Biological Sciences)
Boyce, Mark (Biological Sciences)
Lewis, Mark (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2012-09-12T10:50:38Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
In western North America cougar populations are increasing and expanding eastward. Simultaneously, growing human populations are creating new challenges for managers charged with maintaining the viability of cougar populations and their ungulate prey. Information on how cougars respond to human-dominated landscapes and interact with their prey will aid managers in balancing the effects of growing cougar populations with the wishes of growing human populations. Using resource selections functions, I examined cougar responses to roads of varying traffic volumes. Cougars selected rugged terrain presumably to insulate themselves from roads with greater traffic. When assessing impacts of expanding road networks, more attention should be given to roadside topography. Using fine-scale movement and activity data, I examined cougar predatory behaviour. Cougars employed an active stalking style of predation, moving throughout the landscape to locate, stalk, and kill prey. Future models of predator-prey dynamics should consider the cougar’s active style of predation.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R37Q4S
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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