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The Use of Mental Imagery By Physical Education Teachers Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Physical Education
Mental Imagery
Teaching
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Hall, Nathan D
Supervisor and department
Hickson, CLive (Elementary Education)
Melnychuk, Nancy (Secondary Education)
Examining committee member and department
Buck, George (Educational Psychology)
Chorney, David (Secondary Education)
Forsberg, Nick (University of Regina, Faculty of Education)
da Costa, Jose (Educational Policy Studies)
Department
Department of Secondary Education
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-01-10T15:11:29Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
Researchers have reported that people in many professions (e.g., professional athletes, coaches, law enforcement officers, family physicians and surgeons) commonly employ mental imagery and find it to be a useful aid when completing the behaviours common to their profession (Hall, 2001; Jedlic, Hall, Munroe-Chandler, & Hall, 2007; Edwards, Sadoski, & Burdenski, 2005). Recently researchers have encouraged the investigation of mental imagery use among physical educators (Hall & Fishburne, 2010). However, there has been no research to date on mental imagery use by physical education teachers. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the use of mental imagery by those who teach physical education. Bandura’s (1986) Social Cognitive Theory and Paivio’s Analytic Framework of Mental Imagery (1985) were used as a foundation for this research. Consequently, this research focused on the teaching behaviours and self-regulatory behaviours of physical educators, and the possible use of the cognitive and motivational functions of mental imagery to aid in these behaviours. A basic qualitative study methodology (Merriam, 2009) was employed as a means of completing this investigation. Fifteen teachers who specialized in teaching physical education at the middle or secondary school grade level participated in this research. A convenience sample of participants was recruited from schools in both Alberta and Ontario using the snowball sampling effect (Patton, 1990). The participants varied in gender, age, years of teaching experience, grade(s) presently taught, and gender of students taught. Each physical education teacher who participated in the study completed a one-on-one semi-structured interview, as well as, a short demographic questionnaire. Following data collection thematic coding of the data was completed. The results demonstrated that the physical education teachers in the present study were employing mental imagery to aid in many of the teaching behaviours and self-regulatory behaviours that are common in their profession. In addition, the participants indicated that they used the cognitive function of mental imagery more commonly than the motivational function of mental imagery. Furthermore, most of the participants perceived mental imagery to be a beneficial skill, and yet the use of mental imagery by the participants was completely unstructured (i.e., never planned). These results have potential implications for both present physical education teachers and also physical education teacher education programs.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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