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Relationships and introgression within Carthamus (Asteraceae), with an emphasis on safflower (Carthamus tinctorius). Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
introgression
microsatellite
Carthamus
relationships
phylogenetics
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Bowles, Victoria
Supervisor and department
Hall, Jocelyn (Biological Sciences)
Good, Allen (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Cahill, James (Biological Sciences)
Hamann, Andreas (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-07-09T19:36:47Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Carthamus (Asteraceae) contains both crop species (C. tinctorius, safflower) and weedy species, increasing the need for a better understanding of the genus. Despite previous studies, many outstanding questions remain regarding the phylogenetic relationships of safflower, especially with regards to the weedy species. Investigation of the relationships in Carthamus was done using sequence data. The closest relative to C. tinctorius was studied using microsatellite data. Microsatellite data was also utilized to track the introgression of C. oxyacanthus DNA into the C. tinctorius genome in an interspecific cross. Sequence data supports the division of the genus into two sections, Carthamus and Atractylis. Both sequence and microsatellite data reveal that most traditionally recognized species are not monophyletic. Microsatellite data indicates that C. palaestinus is the closest relative of cultivated safflower. Microsatellites also indicate that C. oxyacanthus DNA is able to move into the C. tinctorius genome, showing potential for breeding programs and raising concerns for potential transgenic crops.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 15028505
Last modified: 2015:10:12 13:34:15-06:00
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File title: Thesis - pre pages
File author: Jocelyn Hall
Page count: 140
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