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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3CQ28

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Aggressiveness, boldness, and lateralization: an investigation of personality by sex and alternative male morph in Pelvicachromis pulcher Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
aggression
lateralization
Pelvicachromis pulcher
kribensis
boldness
personality
morph
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Seaver, Cheryl Marie Sedlak
Supervisor and department
Hurd, Peter (Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Bisanz, Jeff (Psychology)
Sturdy, Chris (Psychology)
St. Clair, Colleen Cassady (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-01-27T11:13:33Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Animal personality, patterns of behavior that are consistent across time and contexts, is a growing area of study and has been documented in a wide array of species. Some personality traits show sex differences. Recent work on the kribensis cichlid (Pelvicachromis pulcher) suggests that some variation within sex may be related to their environmental sex determination system. Little is known about personality in this species, however, in this thesis I examine the personalities of females and two alternative male morphs with respect to aggression, boldness, and lateralization. I investigate how the gender and morphs are related to personality and how the characteristics of personality intersect and interact with one another. To evaluate these characteristics I ran fish through five tests: an aggression assay, an open field exploration task, an novel environment emergence boldness task, and several cerebral lateralization tests. I demonstrate that 1) the different sexes and morphs employ different aggressive strategies; 2) there are boldness differences between the sexes, but not the morph types; and 3) there are also lateralization differences in eye use between the sexes and morphs, which are, to a certain extent, dependent upon the stimuli. These results suggest that females are very different from either male morph type particularly with regard to aggression and boldness.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3CQ28
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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