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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31X27

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From borderlands to bordered lands: the plains metis and the 49th parallel, 1869-1885 Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Nationalisation
Community Case Study
Plains Metis
Forty-ninth Parallel
Colonisation
Turtle Mountain
Borderlands
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Pollock, Katie
Supervisor and department
Gerhard Ens, History and Classics, University of Alberta
Examining committee member and department
Chris Anderson, Native Studies, University of Alberta
Robert Irwin, History and Classics, University of Alberta
David Mills, History and Classics, University of Alberta
Gerhard Ens, History and Classics, University of Alberta
Department
Department of History and Classics
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-08-28T20:39:11Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The following study is an attempt to comprehend the impact that the Canadian-United States border along the forty-ninth parallel had on the Plains Metis between 1869 and 1885, and how members of this community continued to manipulate the border to meet their own objectives. From the 1860s to 1880s, state definitions of Metis status, as well as government recognition and non-recognition of Metis identity, had a profound impact on the Plains Metis. Imposed state classifications and statuses limited the choices of many to enter treaty, be recognised as a citizen, or reside in a partiuclar country. The implementation of these status definitions began after 1875 when the enforcement of the international boundary began in earnest, and it was this endforcement that represented the beginnings of the colonisation of the Plains Metis.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31X27
Rights
License granted by Katie Pollock (kcpolloc@ualberta.ca) on 2009-08-27T19:41:24Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Thesis
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File author: Katie Pollock
Page count: 134
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