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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30S62

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Exploring Novel Methods in Sonoportation Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Delivery
Sonoporation
Transfection
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Wong, Peter Kwok Pan
Supervisor and department
Chen, Jie (Electrical Engineering/Biomedical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Xing, James (Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Li, Lawrence (Biomedical Engineering)
Department
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-09-14T10:28:18Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Sonoporation, a physical, non-viral, non-chemical transfection method, promises great potentials. However, many drawbacks hinders its generalization. Low transfection rate and cell viability after treatment are among the hindering factors of sonoporation. The purpose of the research performed in this thesis was to develop, explore and analyze new methodologies to overcome the known drawbacks of sonoporation, which are to increase cell viability and transfection rate. These novel methods include the use of a self-developed ultrasound box, self-developed microbubble carriers and the synergistic use of chemical transfection reagents. Sonoporation were performed on MCF-7 and KG-1 cells as they represent easy and difficult to transfect cell lines respectively. Permeability markers, flow cytometry, MTT assay and MTS assay were used to quantify transfection rate and cell viability after sonoporation. New procedures were performed, analyzed and evaluated for their feasibility for drug and or gene delivery. The thesis has shown improvements in transfection rate and preserving viability. However, sonoporation still remains an inefficient method to deliver material into hard-to-transfect cells.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30S62
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Wong, P., Choi, M.A., Gul-Uludag, H., Ang, W.T., Xu, P., Xing, J., Chen, J.; "Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery into hard-to-transfect KG-1 cells," Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE/NIH Life Science Systems and Applications Workshop (2011), P.143-146.

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