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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30M6B

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ProAnalyser: a multimedia modeling and authoring framework for discerning student learning processes Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Authoring
eLearning
Adaptive
Education
Assessment
Multimedia
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Rossol, Nathaniel
Supervisor and department
Mandal, Mrinal (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Cheng, Irene (Computing Science)
Examining committee member and department
Bilash, Olenka (Education)
Cheng, Irene (Computing Science)
Mandal, Mrinal (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Miller, James (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Department
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-01-06T17:50:39Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Online multimedia education systems traditionally tend to consist almost exclusively of multiple choice or numeric response style questions. However, many curricula such as math, physics, and chemistry typically involve students completing large, complex, multi-step problems where the process used to solve the problem is more important than the final answer. Current online multimedia systems are generally insufficient to model or assess problems like these. In this thesis, I address this issue by implementing a Process Analyzer and its authoring tool. The Process Analyzer aims to improve student problem solving skills by acting as a self-tutoring tool that can analyze a student’s problem-solving process and adapt accordingly, providing corrective guidance hints if necessary. Secondly, it provides instructors with an in-depth analysis of the process or thinking steps that students are using to solve complex problems. Instructors can therefore assess students based on their problem-solving process, and not just their final answer.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30M6B
Rights
License granted by Nathaniel Rossol (nrossol@ualberta.ca) on 2010-01-04T22:38:59Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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