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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3PM55

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Parent-child mutuality and preschoolers’ social problem solving in response to five narratives Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
parent-child
preschooler
mutuality
narrative
social problem solving
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Funamoto, Allyson
Supervisor and department
Rinaldi, Christina (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Prochner, Larry (Elementary Education)
Pei, Jacqueline (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Psychological Studies in Education
Date accepted
2012-08-07T11:30:35Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The current study examined whether: (a) mother- or father-child mutuality predicts social problem-solving (SPS) strategies preschoolers use and (b) boys and girls use varying strategies with different social problems. Fifty-eight parent-child dyads participated (29 girls and 29 boys between 25- and 42-months-old; M = 32.5, SD = 5.4). Dyads were individually videotaped playing together and were coded for mutuality using the Mutually Responsive Orientation Scale (Aksan, Kochanska, & Ortmann, 2006). One year later, children were videotaped completing stories from the MacArthur Story Stem Battery (Bretherton, Oppenheim, Buchsbaum, Emde, & the MacArthur Narrative Group, 1990). Responses were coded for (a) prosocial, (b) socially negative, and (c) avoidant SPS strategies. Results indicated that parent-child mutuality was not predictive of children’s SPS strategies, however boys and girls employed different strategies depending on the story stem. Findings and implications were discussed in light of literature on children’s social competence in different contexts.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3PM55
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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