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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30F23

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Isomer profiles of perfluorochemicals in matched maternal, cord and house dust samples: manufacturing sources and transplacental transfer. Open Access

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Author or creator
Beesoon. S.
Webster, G.
Shoeib, M.
Harner, T.
Benskin, J. P.
Martin, J. W.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
PFOA
PFOS
isomers
perfluorochemicals
transplacental transfer
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
Background: Perfluorochemicals (PFCs) are detectable in the general population and in the human environment, including house dust. Sources are not well characterized, but isomer patterns should enable differentiation of historical and contemporary manufacturing sources. Isomer-specific maternal–fetal transfer of PFCs has not been examined despite known developmental toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in rodents. Objectives: We elucidated relative contributions of electrochemical (phased out in 2001) and telomer (contemporary) PFCs in dust and measured how transplacental transfer efficiency (TTE; based on a comparison of maternal and cord sera concentrations) is affected by perfluorinated chain length and isomer branching pattern. Methods: We analyzed matching samples of house dust (n = 18), maternal sera (n = 20), and umbilical cord sera (n = 20) by isomer-specific high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results: PFOA isomer signatures revealed that telomer sources accounted for 0–95% of total PFOA in house dust (median, 31%). This may partly explain why serum PFOA concentrations are not declining in some countries despite the phase-out of electrochemical PFOA. TTE data indicate that total branched isomers crossed the placenta more efficiently than did linear isomers for both PFOS (p < 0.01) and PFOA (p = 0.02) and that placental transfer of branched isomers of PFOS increased as the branching point moved closer to the sulfonate (SO3–) end of the molecule. Conclusions: Results suggest that humans are exposed to telomer PFOA, but larger studies that also account for dietary sources should be conducted. The exposure profile of PFOS and PFOA isomers can differ between the mother and fetus—an important consideration for perinatal epidemiology studies of PFCs.
Date created
2011
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30F23
License information
Rights
Copyright 2011 MDPI. Reproduced with permission from Environmental Health Perspectives.
Citation for previous publication
Beesoon S, Webster G, Shoeib M, Harner T, Benskin JP, Martin JW. (2011) Isomer profiles of perfluorochemicals in matched maternal, cord and house dust samples: manufacturing sources and transplacental transfer. Environmental Health Perspectives. 119(11),1659-64.
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