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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3962G

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Exploring dimensions of place-power and culture in the social resilience of forest-dependent communities Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
power
natural-resource dependence
culture
collective action
communities
place
social resilience
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lyon, Christopher
Supervisor and department
Krogman, Naomi (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Parkins, John (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Garvin, Theresa (Earth and Atmospheric Science)
Department
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-28T03:03:09Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Over the last decade, the forest industry in Canada has been severely impacted by post-Fordist shifts in economic, political and land-tenure regimes, as well as ecological impacts related to climate change. Because of these impacts, many forest-based communities have lost mills and jobs and have faced difficult challenges about the future of their communities and livelihoods. Drawing on social ecological resilience theory and case study insights from two forest-based communities in British Columbia (Fort St. James and Youbou), this thesis explores community responses to forest industry mill closure. In contributing to a social ecological resilience theory, I explore the way place interacts with power to influence community response to change. I also identify agency, structure, and culture as important elements of collective action and community adaptation. These theoretical discussions are illustrated through case study material to give greater emphasis and understanding to the social dimensions of social ecological resilience in communities that are facing dramatic change.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3962G
Rights
License granted by Christopher Lyon (clyon@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-26T17:52:17Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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