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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3736M957

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Locating Opportunities: Women, Ritualizations, and Social Experimentation in Early Jesus Groups Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Women
Social Experimentation
Early Christianity
Ritualization
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Brkich, Angela L
Supervisor and department
Braun, Willi (History and Classics)
Examining committee member and department
Kitchen, John (History and Classics)
Landy, Francis (History and Classics)
Muir, Stephen (Religious Studies)
Cooper, Kate (Religious Studies)
Brown, Sylvia (English and Film Studies)
Department
Religious Studies
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-03-05T11:03:22Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
The descriptions of women found in early Christian texts are not consistent. In some cases women are depicted as powerful and influential individuals who contributed to the development of their religious community, while in other cases women are described as marginal and problematic. This dissertation is devoted to documenting and explaining the varying views on and positions of women in early Christian associations. Central to this project is the question if there is a connection between social experimentations, ritual performances, and the status of women in specific early Christian communities. This project demonstrates that women belonging to the earliest Jesus groups and later Christian groups found opportunities to exhibit agency and power as well as challenge social paradigms. However, this research also demonstrates that women belonging to numerous Greco-Roman and Jewish associations found the same opportunities. Rather than focus on specific worldviews or beliefs, this project suggests that we should consider what practices granted women the opportunities to challenge the idealized traditional Greco-Roman gender paradigms and obtain leadership positions.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3736M957
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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