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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3SH52

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Analysis of Storage and Conveyance Characteristics of the Mackenzie Delta Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Hydraulic
Hydrology
LiDAR
Mackenzie Delta
Water Storage
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
French, Christopher M
Supervisor and department
Hicks, Faye (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Davies, Evan (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Kim, Amy (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Department
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Specialization
Water Resources Engineering
Date accepted
2013-12-19T13:41:40Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The Mackenzie Delta is the second largest northern delta in the world. The water from the Delta entering the Beaufort Sea has a significant impact on its dynamics. Areas in the Delta were surveyed using LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging). The goals of this study were to characterize the floodplain storage of the surveyed parts of the Delta and determine if there are trends in these characteristics across and down the Delta. The storage area consisted of lakes and the overland floodplain areas. Cross sections were taken from the LiDAR data to estimate the conveyance and storage areas above the low water levels. The conveyance and storage trends, lake distribution, as well as lake and channel water elevations of each zone are discussed. Results from this study could be used to help develop zone-based storage relationships to be used in a hydraulic model.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3SH52
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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