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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3DW29

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Use of woody debris as an amendment for reclamation after oil sands mining Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Woody debris
Reclamation
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Brown, Robyn L.
Supervisor and department
Naeth, M. Anne (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Chanasyk, David S. (Renewable Resources)
Chang, Scott X. (Renewable Resources)
Foght, Julia M. (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-03-26T15:05:26Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This research determined if woody debris amendments facilitate land reclamation after oil sands mining. Specifically, it assessed if woody debris affects vegetation cover and richness, woody species survival and abundance, soil nutrients, temperature and water, microbial biomass carbon and mycorrhizal biomass. A four year old site and a two year old site were used to compare treatments with and without woody debris. Woody debris did not affect initial vegetation emergence, but increased species richness and decreased introduced species cover. After winter assessments found woody debris cover positively associated with vegetation cover. More saplings planted on woody debris treatments survived and woody debris cover was positively associated with woody plant abundance. Woody debris treatments had lower soil nitrogen and higher phosphorus, suggesting nitrogen immobilization and leachate high in phosphorus. Soil under woody debris had a lower temperature range and higher soil volumetric water content. No differences were found in microbial parameters.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3DW29
Rights
License granted by Robyn Brown (rlb@ualberta.ca) on 2010-03-25T17:48:15Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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