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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R33K5J

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An initial zooarchaeological analysis of Magubike and Mlambalasi: Two archaeological sites from the Iringa region of Southern Tanzania Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
east africa
subsistence strategies
zooarchaeology
taphonomy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Collins, Benjamin Robert
Supervisor and department
Willoughby, Pamela R. (Anthropology)
Examining committee member and department
Murray, Alison (Biological Sciences)
Losey, Robert (Anthropology)
Department
Department of Anthropology
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-05-29T15:01:10Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Arts in Anthropology
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The current study consists of a preliminary analysis of the faunal materials recovered from test pit excavations at Magubike (HxJf-01) and Mlambalasi (HwJf-02), two archaeological sites in the Iringa district of Tanzania. Both sites contain faunal materials from the Iron Age, Later Stone Age and Middle Stone Age, which is unique for this region and causes them to be particularly germane to the behavioural modernity debate. The analysis of the faunal materials employed a combined zooarchaeological and taphonomic approach designed to elucidate each site’s formational history and human behavioural component. Through the construction of a sound taphonomic framework, an initial understanding of the formational processes at both sites was achieved and insight into Iron Age human subsistence strategies was attained. The poor preservation of the Later Stone Age and Middle Stone Age faunal materials precluded an understanding of the human subsistence strategies employed during these periods.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R33K5J
Rights
License granted by Benjamin Collins (bcollins@ualberta.ca) on 2009-05-29T14:36:31Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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